November 6, 2019
Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) sent to the RFC Editor

OAuth logoI’m pleased to report that the Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) specification is now technically stable and will shortly be an RFC – an Internet standard. Specifically, it has now progressed to the RFC Editor queue, meaning that the only remaining step before finalization is editorial due diligence. Thus, implementations can now utilize the draft specification with confidence that that breaking changes will not occur as it is finalized.

The abstract of the specification is:

This specification describes how to declare in a CBOR Web Token (CWT) (which is defined by RFC 8392) that the presenter of the CWT possesses a particular proof-of-possession key. Being able to prove possession of a key is also sometimes described as being the holder-of-key. This specification provides equivalent functionality to “Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for JSON Web Tokens (JWTs)” (RFC 7800) but using Concise Binary Object Representation (CBOR) and CWTs rather than JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) and JSON Web Tokens (JWTs).

Thanks to the ACE working group for completing this important specification.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

October 24, 2019
COSE and JOSE Registrations for WebAuthn Algorithms spec addressing WGLC comments

IETF logoThe “COSE and JOSE Registrations for WebAuthn Algorithms” specification has been updated to address working group last call (WGLC) feedback received. Thanks to J.C. Jones, Kevin Jacobs, Jim Schaad, Neil Madden, and Benjamin Kaduk for their useful reviews.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

October 22, 2019
JSON Web Token Best Current Practices sent to the RFC Editor

OAuth logoI’m pleased to report that the JSON Web Token (JWT) Best Current Practices (BCP) specification is now technically stable and will shortly be an RFC – an Internet standard. Specifically, it has now progressed to the RFC Editor queue, meaning that the only remaining step before finalization is editorial due diligence. Thus, implementations can now utilize the draft specification with confidence that that breaking changes will not occur as it is finalized.

The abstract of the specification is:

JSON Web Tokens, also known as JWTs, are URL-safe JSON-based security tokens that contain a set of claims that can be signed and/or encrypted. JWTs are being widely used and deployed as a simple security token format in numerous protocols and applications, both in the area of digital identity, and in other application areas. The goal of this Best Current Practices document is to provide actionable guidance leading to secure implementation and deployment of JWTs.

Thanks to the OAuth working group for completing this important specification.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

October 21, 2019
OpenID Connect Federation draft 09 ready for your review

OpenID logoDraft 09 of the OpenID Connect Federation specification has been published at https://openid.net/specs/openid-connect-federation-1_0-09.html. This version of the specification benefitted from in-person review by experts at IIW. Major changes were:

  • Separated entity configuration discovery from operations provided by the federation API.
  • Defined new authentication error codes.

The authors believe that this version should become the second Implementer’s Draft, in preparation for interop testing in the coming year. Please review!

October 21, 2019
Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) spec addressing Gen-ART and SecDir reviews

IETF logoA new version of the Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) specification has been published addressing the Gen-ART and SecDir review comments. Thanks to Christer Holmberg and Yoav Nir, respectively, for these useful reviews.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

October 10, 2019
Using OpenID Connect Self-Issued to Achieve DID Auth

OpenID logoMy co-authors and I recently competed the paper Using OpenID Connect Self-Issued to Achieve DID Auth, which was created as a result of discussions at the eighth Rebooting the Web of Trust workshop. The paper’s abstract is:

Proving control of a DID requires proving ownership of a private key corresponding to a public key for the DID. Of course, this could be done with a new DID-specific protocol. However, standard protocols for proving ownership of a public/private key pair already exist.

This paper describes how to reuse the Self-Issued OpenID Connect (SIOP) specification and related protocol messages to prove control of a DID. It describes both why and how to do this. Related topics, such as release of claims, are also touched upon.

Several people came to the workshop wanting to explore how to use the OpenID Connect Self-Issued OpenID Provider functionality to prove control of a Decentralized Identifier (DID), including myself. The paper describes the approach being taken by a number of groups using DIDs, including Microsoft. The paper’s publication is timely, as the W3C DID Working Group has just formed to create a DID standard. Microsoft is an active member of the working group.

Special thanks to Dmitri Zagidulin for getting the paper over the finish line!

October 1, 2019
Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) spec addressing remaining Area Director comments

IETF logoA new version of the Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) specification has been published to address the remaining Area Director review comments by Benjamin Kaduk. Thanks to Ludwig Seitz for doing the bulk of the editing for this version.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

October 1, 2019
OpenID Presentations at September 2019 OpenID Workshop and IIW

OpenID logoI gave the following presentations at the Monday, September 30, 2019 OpenID Workshop at Verizon Media:

I also gave the following invited “101” session presentation at the Internet Identity Workshop (IIW) on Tuesday, October 1, 2019:

September 19, 2019
Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) spec addressing Area Director review comments

IETF logoThe Proof-of-Possession Key Semantics for CBOR Web Tokens (CWTs) specification has been updated to address the Area Director review comments by Benjamin Kaduk. Thanks to Ludwig Seitz and Hannes Tschofenig for their work on resolving the issues raised.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

August 16, 2019
OAuth Device Flow is now RFC 8628

OAuth logoThe OAuth Device Flow specification (recently renamed to be the OAuth 2.0 Device Authorization Grant specification) is now RFC 8628. The abstract describes the specification as:

The OAuth 2.0 device authorization grant is designed for Internet-connected devices that either lack a browser to perform a user-agent-based authorization or are input constrained to the extent that requiring the user to input text in order to authenticate during the authorization flow is impractical. It enables OAuth clients on such devices (like smart TVs, media consoles, digital picture frames, and printers) to obtain user authorization to access protected resources by using a user agent on a separate device.

This specification standardizes an already widely-deployed pattern in production use by Facebook, ForgeRock, Google, Microsoft, Salesforce, and many others. Thanks to all of you who helped make this existing practice an actual standard!

July 24, 2019
OAuth 2.0 Token Exchange specification sent to the RFC Editor

OAuth logoI’m very pleased to report that the OAuth 2.0 Token Exchange specification is now technically stable and will shortly be an RFC – an Internet standard. Specifically, it has now progressed to the RFC Editor queue, meaning that the only remaining step before finalization is editorial due diligence. Thus, implementations can now utilize the draft specification with confidence that that breaking changes will not occur as it is finalized.

The abstract of the specification is:

This specification defines a protocol for an HTTP- and JSON-based Security Token Service (STS) by defining how to request and obtain security tokens from OAuth 2.0 authorization servers, including security tokens employing impersonation and delegation.

Thanks to the OAuth working group for completing this important specification. And thanks to Brian Campbell for taking point in making the recent updates to get us here.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

July 8, 2019
Security Event Token (SET) delivery specifications updated in preparation for IETF 105

IETF logoThe two Security Event Token (SET) delivery specifications have been updated to address working group feedback received, in preparation for discussions at IETF 105 in Montreal. Only minor terminological updates were made to the Push Delivery spec following the working group last call (WGLC) changes in the previous recent revisions. Thanks to Annabelle Backman for the edits to the Push Delivery spec.

The changes to the Poll Delivery spec further aligned it with the Push spec, referencing shared functionality, rather than duplicating it. I believe that the Poll spec is now ready for working group last call.

The specifications are available at:

HTML-formatted versions are also available at:

July 8, 2019
Refinements to COSE and JOSE Registrations for WebAuthn Algorithms

IETF logoThe “COSE and JOSE Registrations for WebAuthn Algorithms” specification has been updated to address feedback received since working group adoption. The one breaking change is changing the secp256k1 curve identifier for JOSE from “P-256K” to “secp256k1”, for reasons described by John Mattsson. The draft now also specifies that the SHA-256 hash function is to be used with “ES256K” signatures – a clarification due to Matt Palmer.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

June 25, 2019
OpenID Connect Federation Progress at TNC19

OpenID logoCheck out the post OpenID Connect Federation Progress describing the recent updates that Roland Hedberg and I made to the OpenID Connect Federation 1.0 specification. We used the TNC19 conference – a gathering of federation experts – as a venue to get together to review and refine the specification. Besides getting lots done on the spec, I also really enjoyed the TNC conference and its attendees!

Given that the syntax and semantics should now be stable, it’s my hope that early adopters will start kicking the tires – building implementations and making trial deployments. I can’t wait for the useful feedback that results!

May 22, 2019
W3C WebAuthn and FIDO 2.0 win 2019 European Identity and Cloud Award

EIC logoThe W3C WebAuthn and FIDO 2.0 standards have won the 2019 European Identity and Cloud Award for Best Future Technology / Standard Project at the European Identity and Cloud (EIC) conference. This award recognizes the significance of these recently-approved standards, which enable password-less sign-in with platform authenticators, mobile devices, and security keys. They provide a huge step forward for online security, privacy, and convenience.

Thanks to Kuppinger Cole for recognizing the importance and impact of these important new standards!

EIC 2019 Award EIC 2019 Award Certificate

May 16, 2019
OpenID Presentations at 2019 European Identity and Cloud (EIC) Conference

OpenID logoI gave the following presentations at the May 14, 2019 OpenID Workshop at the 2019 European Identity and Cloud (EIC) conference:

This deck was also prepared but not presented, due to time limitations:

May 6, 2019
Azure Active Directory Achieves OpenID Certification

OpenID Certified logoI’m delighted to report that Azure Active Directory (AAD) has achieved OpenID Certification. This is true both of the AAD V1 identity provider, which enables sign-in with organization identities, and the AAD V2 identity provider, which enables sign-in with both personal and organizational identities. See the certification listings and the Microsoft identity platform announcement.

While AAD has supported OpenID Connect for years, the push to achieve OpenID Certification closed a number of gaps in AAD’s feature set — mostly notably, adding support for the UserInfo Endpoint to AAD V2. This work was part of Microsoft’s commitment to utilizing widely-adopted open identity standards. Kudos to the AAD engineering team for bringing this important developer-focused work to completion!

April 30, 2019
OpenID Presentations at April 2019 OpenID Workshop and IIW

OpenID logoI gave the following presentations at the Monday, April 29, 2019 OpenID Workshop at Verizon Media:

I also gave the following invited “101” session presentation at the Internet Identity Workshop (IIW) on Tuesday, April 30, 2019:

April 3, 2019
OAuth 2.0 Demonstration of Proof-of-Possession at the Application Layer

OAuth logoI’m excited that a new, simpler approach for application-level proof of possession of OAuth access tokens and refresh tokens is being developed by members of the IETF OAuth working group. The effort is led by Daniel Fett, who had previously done formal analysis of the OAuth protocol. I wanted to bring it to your attention now to solicit your early feedback. This approach was designed in discussions at the Fourth OAuth Security Workshop and is captured in a new individual draft specification for Demonstration of Proof-of-Possession (DPoP) intended for the OAuth working group. The abstract of the new specification is:

This document describes a mechanism for sender-constraining OAuth 2.0 tokens via a proof-of-possession mechanism on the application level. This mechanism allows to detect replay attacks with access and refresh tokens.

The specification is still an early draft and undergoing active development, but I believe the approach shows a lot of promise and is likely to be adopted by the OAuth working group soon. It works by creating a proof-of-possession signature over an access token or refresh token that would otherwise be a bearer token. And there’s already one implementation that I’m aware of – by Filip Skokan of Auth0. Let us know what you think of this new work!

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

March 27, 2019
Working group adoption of “COSE and JOSE Registrations for WebAuthn Algorithms”

IETF logoI’m pleased to report that the IETF COSE Working Group has adopted the specification “COSE and JOSE Registrations for WebAuthn Algorithms”. An abstract of what it does is:

This specification defines how to use several algorithms with COSE [RFC8152] that are used by implementations of the W3C Web Authentication (WebAuthn) [WebAuthn] and FIDO2 Client to Authenticator Protocol (CTAP) [CTAP] specifications. These algorithms are to be registered in the IANA “COSE Algorithms” registry [IANA.COSE.Algorithms] and also in the IANA “JSON Web Signature and Encryption Algorithms” registry [IANA.JOSE.Algorithms], when not already registered there.

The algorithms registered are RSASSA-PKCS1-v1_5 with four different hash functions and signing with the secp256k1 curve. Note that there was consensus in the working group meeting not to work on registrations for the Elliptic Curve Direct Anonymous Attestation (ECDAA) algorithms “ED256” and “ED512”, both because of issues that have been raised with them and because they are not in widespread use.

The -01 version will address the review comments received on the mailing list from Jim Schaad and John Mattsson.

The specification is available at:

An HTML-formatted version is also available at:

Next »